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Married And Looking In Rangpur







Vincent De Brouwere Mareied he also added funds for conducting this research. How would you maintain your baby and you together. Lucky health achievement despite economic poverty. Government of Bangladesh has deployed CHWs e. How would you up your baby and you together. Studies showed that visit of community health workers positively first the use of contraceptive methods [ 3637 ].

This conflicting evidence can be explained by variation in methodologies Married and looking in rangpur studies and their context. Notwithstanding, it is evident that timely uptake of quality maternal health services is essential in decreasing the incidence of adverse maternal health outcomes among women in Married and looking in rangpur age groups [ 13 — 17 ]. Despite substantial progress in reducing maternal mortality in the past two decades, rates of adolescent pregnancy remain high [ 18 ] and the use of skilled maternal health services is still low in Bangladesh [ 18 ].

This huge proportion of child marriage contributes to the high rates of pregnancies among adolescent girls in Cam2cam virtual. This evidence comes predominantly from quantitative studies, and Married and looking in rangpur far, very little qualitative research has been performed on the maternal health-care-seeking behavior of adolescent girls. Moreover, no qualitative study has followed up and explored the maternal health care-seeking behavior of adolescents during and after pregnancy. To fill this gap, we opted for conducting a prospective qualitative study. More specifically, we explored whether adolescent girls were able to deliver in the place they intended to and if not, which factors influenced their health care-seeking behavior.

Findings of this study will serve to inform and support maternal health programs and policies targeting adolescent girls with the aim to improve their maternal health. Materials and Methods Study design This was a prospective qualitative study in which data were collected from married adolescent girls in two phases. Multiple data sources were used to triangulate and validate the findings including in-depth interviews IDIs with married adolescent girls, key informant interviews KIIs and focus group discussions FGDs with different stakeholders. Study setting This study was conducted in Rangpur district in Rangpur division, Bangladesh. We purposively selected married adolescent girls residing in three sub-districts of Rangpur district: Mithapukur, Kaunia and Badarganj.

Socio-economic conditions, cultural practices and beliefs and access to maternal health services are quite similar for the people living in these three sub-districts. Community health workers from BRAC an international development organization based in Bangladesh have been delivering door-to-door family planning and maternal care services in almost every village in the three sub-districts of Rangpur. Study population Qualitative data were collected from a wide range of respondents. In addition to married adolescent girls, the main study population, we collected data from community health workers, community people, family members of adolescent girls mothers-in-law and husbandsrepresentatives from the government, NGOs and health providers.

Table 1 shows a list of study participants and data collection methods. To some extent, religious beliefs played a role in the timing of childbirth. Moreover, adolescent girls who belonged to families adhering strictly to religious rules were less likely to use family planning methods. Factors related to service provision Almost all adolescent girls mentioned about the availability of community health workers in providing contraceptive methods in the community, mainly recruited by the BRAC maternal health project. Government health workers were rarely seen in the communities. However, several respondents questioned and doubted the quality of the contraceptive options provided by the government.

Discussion This study revealed that factors situated on different levels i. These factors emerged largely similarly from the various data collection sources. They were intertwined and influenced each other as can be seen in Fig 1. Our findings show that a small proportion of adolescents married girls who were still at school are in line with other studies [ 1527 ].

Also in line with the findings in a systematic review, this study ragpur that limited knowledge about reproductive health including contraceptive use and safe motherhood may lead eangpur Married and looking in rangpur pregnancies [ 28 ]. A low level of education, unemployment, and financial dependency on husbands or parents-in-law put many adolescent girls in a situation where, often, their voices are not taken into account by others [ 3031 ]. When a girl is married during adolescence, she is automatically put in a situation where she is Mareied empowered in the social structure [ 30 ]. A study conducted in Bangladesh found that the husband played an important role in making decisions regarding contraceptive use and childbearing which also supports the findings of this study [ 24 ].

Another study also showed the influence that mothers-in-law have on contraceptive use and childbearing in the decision-making process [ 3233 ]. Two aspects made husbands and mothers-in-law influential in this process. Firstly, in the context of rural Bangladesh, men are usually the wage earners, lead the household, and ultimately make most of the household decisions regarding health care [ 18 ]. Secondly, family planning is still considered a matter for women, hence mothers-in-law are perceived as the most experienced people in this matter [ 24 ]. When husbands did not have a job or income, then mothers-in-law became more influential in the household.

Regardless of the income status of husbands, the key role of mothers-in-law is well understood from different studies conducted in Bangladesh and neighboring country Pakistan [ 2423 ]. In line with the results of previous studies conducted in Bangladesh and its neighbouring country Nepal, this study showed that a lack of communication and negotiation ability with the husband negatively affects informed decision-making on contraceptive use and childbearing [ 73334 ]. Because of the age and power differentials between wives and husbands, often a newly married adolescent girl hesitates or refrains from talking to her husband about contraceptive methods which limits inter-spousal communication.

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This aand found that adolescent girls often received incorrect or misleading information from neighbours and sisters-in-law which led to mistrust lookiing the use of contraceptive methods. Mistrust and misleading information also scared women and influenced them not to use contraceptive methods before having the first child [ 33 ]. Studies Married and looking in rangpur that visit of community health workers positively lookinng the use of contraceptive methods [ 3637 ]. Government of Bangladesh has rangpuur CHWs e. Married and looking in rangpur, this study showed lopking adolescent girls were more in contact with CHWs e.

Less frequent contact of government CHWs with adolescent girls might be the reason of existing mistrust about the quality of contraceptive methods provided by the government. Limitations of the study Because of the rural study setting, the results might not be generalizable to urban settings in Bangladesh where adolescent girls tend to have different socio-economic backgrounds. We collected data from 35 married adolescents with different profiles and other stakeholders in order to increase the validity of the information. In addition, a potential limitation was trepidation on the part of the adolescent respondents, who were not used to being interviewed about these sensitive subjects and also were not accustomed to sharing their opinion and personal experiences in general.

Programmatic implications In order to increase the uptake of contraceptives for delaying pregnancies among married adolescent girls, the results of this study emphasize that husbands and mothers-in-law of newly married adolescent girls need to be actively involved in health interventions so that they can make more informed decisions regarding contraceptive use to delay pregnancies up to 20 years [ 38 ].



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